Little Dragon prove they are less puff and more fire

Edinburgh’s Liquid Room is the busiest I have ever seen it. From my position on the balcony, looking down upon the heaving mass of tangled limbs, I get a fairly concrete idea of why some bands develop such God complexes.

Thankfully Little Dragon, the Swedish electro-pop four piece, hold no such complex. Perhaps because of the muted reception to their third studio album Ritual Union, or perhaps because despite being fairly commercially successful, the band haven’t quite ‘made it’ yet, Yukimi Nagano and her boys shimmy on stage and praise the crowd for turning out to see them. Little Dragon capsize the omniscient musician mould and illustrate how in this oh-so-fickle business, the power really does lie with the punters.

Through the Looking Glass is a fairly solid place on which to build, but I have to peer very closely at Nagano to see if she is actually singing. So powerful and pulsing is her voice, that there is no dissimilarity to be found from her studio sound to her performance this evening. Musicians are often criticised for the contradistinction between their live and recorded outputs, but Nagano simply sounds superb. The sonorous notes of her voice explode into the rafters like a firework, and continue to float onto the heads of the devotees long after she has moved on to another resonating note.

High praise indeed from this reviewer: seeing Little Dragon live seems to renew my interest in them. They are not a middling electro pop quartet as first thought, but an edgy, slick, dance act complete with ready-made keneticism and pulsing bass. Add to this mix one heck of a front-woman and three guys in matching white tees – repping their lanky swag like stick men on a mission – and the formula seems pretty much perfect. Source.